Iraq dating scams

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"We cannot stress enough that people need to stop sending money to persons they meet on the Internet and claim to be in the U. military," said Chris Grey, Army CID's spokesman. "We have even seen instances where the Soldier was killed in action and the crooks have used that hero's identity to perpetrate their twisted scam," said CID Special Agent Russel Graves, who has been fielding the hundreds of calls and emails from victims for months."It is heartbreaking to hear these stories over and again of people who have sent thousands of dollars to someone they have never met and sometimes have never even spoken to on the phone." The majority of the "romance scams" as they have been dubbed, are being perpetrated on social media dating-type websites where unsuspecting females are the main target. The scams often involve carefully worded romantic requests for money from the victim to purchase special laptop computers, international telephones, military leave papers, and transportation fees to be used by the fictitious "deployed Soldier" so their false relationship can continue."We've even seen instances where the perpetrators are asking the victims for money to "purchase leave papers" from the Army, help pay for medical expenses from combat wounds received, or help pay for their flight home so they can leave the war zone," said Grey.These scams are outright theft and are a grave misrepresentation of the U. Army and the tremendous amount of support programs and mechanisms that exist for Soldiers today, especially those serving overseas, said Grey.

Others create identities off of British military members.

"This is really despicable." Can’t count on cashier’s checks But Nigerian scams stretch far wider than e-mails asking for help moving money out of international accounts. The criminal sends more than the winning amount and asks for some to be wired back.

In a much more elaborate version of the crime, scammers participate in legitimate online auctions, finish with the high bid, and send along a check to pay for the winnings. When victims apparently successfully deposit the cashier's check, they figure the buyer is legit, and wire the overage, often to a bank account in Nigeria.

Pam Krause of Almond, Wis., thought she was helping out a desperate mother in West Africa.

Instead, she lost ,000 to an elaborate, high-tech swindle, one of the many variations of the so-called "Nigerian scams." The most familiar Nigerian scam is an e-mail offering lots of free money in exchange for helping someone with a name like Barrister Richard Okoya.

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